Category Archives: News

Registration Opening Soon

Registration for the 2022 New Zealand Geographical Society Conference taking place from 23 – 25 November in Christchurch, NZ will be opening soon.

Pencil 8 August into your diaries and register via the conference website.

Alternatively, visit the conference website to sign up for conference updates and program information.

What’s the future of Sydney’s food system?

Charles Sturt University, the City of Sydney and Deliberately Engaging are inviting you envision the future of food in Sydney as part of a knowledge exchange community grant scheme.

Participants are warmly invited to come and contribute your thoughts, ideas and experiences.

For Food Innovators
11.00am, Tuesday
02 August, 2022
Registration Link

For Community Members
07:00pm, Wednesday
03 August, 2022
Registration Link


What’s a Food Innovator?
Anyone doing something interesting, new, sustainable, disruptive, a-bit-different, community-oriented and focused on food!

Think – food sharing, community gardens, new food products, new food services, cooperatives, collectives, markets, food boxes, new ways of growing and distributing food.


You can participate without downloading any software.

Please join the workshop from a computer (desktop or laptop) or a tablet.

The Zoom webinar will not be recorded. The video, audio and chat functions will not enable participants to see or hear each other to protect confidentiality

……
This workshop contributes towards a larger study into urban food systems innovation and will link with the global Urbal Study.

This study has been approved by the Charles Sturt University Human Research Ethic Committee Protocol number: H21466.

You can contact the Chief Investigator, Dr Sarina Kilham via email or on 0269332385 with any questions.

New book publication

Congratulations to all those involved in the new open access book Beyond Global Food Supply Chains: Crisis, Disruption, Regeneration.

Edited by Victoria Stead and Melinda Hinkson, the collection takes the upheaval of the pandemic as a springboard from which to interrogate a larger set of structural, environmental and political fault lines running through the global food system. In a context in which disruptions to the production, distribution and consumption of food are figured as exceptions to the smooth, just-in-time efficiencies of global supply chains, the essays examine the pandemic not simply as a particular and acute moment of disruption but rather as a lens on a deeper, longer set of structural processes within which disruption is endemic.

The thirteen chapters offer short, sharp interventions that track disruptive forces & political possibilities at key points along the global food supply chain – and, critically, beyond it. They traverse subjects ranging from agri-investment to corporate and alternative food production systems, labour relations, pandemic supermarkets, logistics systems, the politics of hunger, the limits of consumer ethics, and the possibilities of supply chain disruptions as moments of reprieve. They offer rich, generative reflections on the contemporary global food system, and would also be very well suited to being used as teaching resources.

Chapters

  1. Introduction: Beyond global supply chains by Melinda Hinkson and Victoria Stead
  2. Supply chains as disruption by Lauren Rickards and Melinda Hinkson
  3. Agri-investment cashing in on COVID-19 by Sarah Sippel
  4. Putting the crisis to work by Victoria Stead and Kirstie Petrou
  5. Going against the grain in the West Australian wheatbelt by Kelly Donati
  6. Reviving community agrarianism in post-socialist China by Daren Shi-Chi-Leung
  7. Fantasies of logistics in Aotearoa New Zealand by Matthew Henry and Carolyn Morris
  8. Reproducing hunger in pandemic America by Maggie Dickinson
  9. The pandemic supermarket by David Boarder Giles
  10. Disruption as reprieve? by Jon Altman and Francis Markham
  11. The UN Food Systems Summit: Disaster capitalism and the future of food by Tomaso Ferrando
  12. Against consumer ethics by Christopher Mayes and Angie Sassano
  13. Afterword: Temporary measures by Alex Blanchette

The book is available free to download here.

SAANZ Conference: Early bird registration now open

Early bird registration for the Sociological Association of Aotearoa New Zealand (SAANZ) Conference 2022 is now open. The conference runs from 6-8 December at the Albany Campus, Massey University, New Zealand.

Other key dates to note are:
10 July – Call for panel closes
7 August – Call for papers closes
6 November – Early bird registration closes
7 November – Standard registration opens


Call for abstracts: 2022 NZGS Conference

Organisers of the New Zealand Geographical Society Conference are calling for abstract submissions. This year’s conference is titled TOITŪ: GEOGRAPHIES OF RESILIENCE and will take place in Christchurch, NZ from 23-25 November 2022. The conference is planned to be both on-site and virtual.

Abstracts and session proposals are encouraged to address the following themes or wider themes in geography:
Theme 1. Resilience in the context of environmental change, governance and/or justice
Theme 2. Well being and health approaches to resilience
Theme 3. Recovery & regenerative development: solutions, approaches, methodologies and practices for social and/or ecological restoration.
Theme 4. Resilience in the context of counter geographies
Theme 5. Resilience in the context of place-based, community grassroots geographies

For more information or to submit a proposal, please visit the conference website.

Abstract and session submissions close 15 July 2022.

PhD Opportunities at the University of Münster

Two PhD opportunities are being offered within a new working group, Economic Geography and Globalisation Research at the Institute of Geography.

“Reimagining rural householding, livelihoods, and communities”
WWU are looking for a dynamic and inquisitive PhD researcher to focus on “Reimagining the Economy” through an investigation of traditional and alternative “neo-rural” practices within the region of Molise, Italy. For more information and to apply, please view the full listing at WWU.

“Digital Agri-food Futures in the Mediterranean”
WWU are looking for a dynamic and motivated PhD researcher to focus on “Digital Food Futures” and investigate the digitisation of farming in the Mediterranean. The goal is to develop and conduct a qualitative research study within one or more Mediterranean countries. For more information and to apply, please view the full listing at WWU.

Applications for both positions close 15 August 2022.

Food Utopias, (Mature) Care, and Hope – published

Congratulations to AFRN member Paul Stock on the publication of his article Food Utopias, (Mature) Care, and Hope in The International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food.

Here is his abstract for the article:
The current period is one of worry and concern over collapse. While many still go hungry, we anticipate a future of food without farmers. Yet in the wake of multiple disasters, the new can emerge. With a focus on food systems centred on care, utopias provide us with tools for dialogue that communicate problems, but also point to possible pathways forward. Following a theory of (mature) care focused on agri-food, food utopias offers a trialectic of critique, experimentation, and process to shape agri-food scholarship of the hopeful, care-centred stories of food and transformation. In combination with ideas about agri-food systems futures, this paper offers examples of care and food utopias from the US Midwest. This is an invitation to combine feminist ideas of care theory and food utopias scholarship that can help broaden our understanding of justice and scholarship around food, farmers, community, and feeding the world.

Stock, P. V. (2021) “Food Utopias, (Mature) Care, and Hope”, The International Journal of Sociology of Agriculture and Food. Paris, France, 27(2), pp. 89–107. doi: 10.48416/ijsaf.v27i2.92.

Journal of Sociology – Special Issue published

Congratulations to AFRN members Kiah Smith and Geoffery Lawrence on the publication of a Journal of Sociology Special Issue (Volume 58 Issue 2, June 2022) titled Transforming Rural Futures.

Kiah served as a guest editor. Kiah and Geoffery also co-authored the article Agri-food scholarship: Past, present and future contributions to Australasian rural sociology.

Here is an extract from the editorial for the Special Issue.

“Historically and now, the rural is frequently relegated to the periphery of broader public and policy debates, and within the discipline of sociology. At this moment in time, where the world needs radical re-imagining for the future, rural perspectives and realities must be visible and addressed. This article introduces a special issue of the Journal of Sociology which seeks to articulate how rural sociology is a crucial field of study for (re)imaging rural futures. In this article, we provide an overview of the research included in the collection, which draws much needed attention to some of the specific contemporary challenges encountered in rural places and some of the possibilities for transforming rural futures, and rural sociology. We argue that rural places are a key site where transformative change can, and does occur, and that rural sociologists are ideally positioned to work with and for rural communities in effecting desired change.”

The Special Issue can be accessed via the Journal of Sociology website.

Call for Papers: ISA RC40 MINI-CONFERENCE

The food system in the (post)pandemic world: Disruptions, vulnerability, resilience, and alternatives
ISA RC40 Mini-Conference
Leipzig, Germany
October 20-21, 2022

No conference fee but registration is required.

This in-person two-day conference welcomes submissions which engage with, but are not limited to, the following questions:

  • How has the pandemic affected agri-food relationships, what kinds of disruptions have we observed, and what are the implications for power relations and existing inequalities? How has the pandemic affected people’s access to food, agricultural working environments, agricultural production, or climatic and ecological conditions across different contexts?
  • What vulnerabilities have emerged during the pandemic, for example, due to various COVID-19 restrictions and political measures, different forms of pandemic governance, changing power balances between food system actors, or financial and economic, and social stresses? How have people tried to cope with these vulnerabilities?
  • What new forms of resiliency have been emerging out of the pandemic situation? What creative solutions have people developed in the face of the pandemic, and what forms of resistance has the pandemic spurred? What can we learn from these resiliencies and resistances for working towards alternative food systems, and the imagination of different agri-food relationships in a (post-)pandemic world?
  • How can we make sense of the complexity of agri-food relationships during the pandemic? What methodological and theoretical challenges have we encountered, what new concepts and methods have emerged, and how can we address and integrate these within the sociology of agriculture and food and critical agri-food studies?

KEY DATES:
1 May 2022               : Deadline for abstract submissions
30 May 2022             : Announcement of accepted abstracts
15 June 2022            : Deadline for confirmation of attendance
1 July 2022               : Announcement of the Mini-Conference programme
20-21 October 2022 : Mini-Conference Days

To register or for more information, visit the mini-conference website.