Tag Archives: News

Updates on conferences previously posted

G’day and we hope that everyone has been staying safe during these challenging and dynamic times.

Three conferences have previously been shared on our website and we have updates on some of them.

Eurosoil 2020 (Geneva, Switzerland, August 2020) – To be advised if proceeding

IRSA 2020 Congress (Carins, Australia, July 2020) – Postponed to July 2021 in the same location

Food Futures in the Anthropocene: Place-Based, Just, Convivial (Tasmania, Australia, November 2020) – Still proceeding but check for updates via their event page

This post will be pinned to the top of the blog roll and will be updated when new information is received.

Stay safe!

Call for panels, papers and workshops | Food Futures in the Anthropocene: Place-Based, Just, Convivial | 8-10 November 2020

Food Futures in the Anthropocene: Place-Based, Just, Convivial

8-10 November 2020

University of Tasmania, Launceston, Australia

CALL FOR PANELS, PAPERS AND WORKSHOPS

Abstract submission deadline: 31 April 2020

Confirmed keynote speakers include:

  • Joshna Maharaj, Toronto (Chef, TEDx Speaker & Author of Take Back the Tray)
  • Prof. Sharon Friel, ANU, Canberra (Editor of Healthy and Sustainable Food Systems)
  • Dr. S. Margot Finn, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Author of Discriminating Taste)
  • Dr. Marvin Montefrio, Yale-NUS College, Singapore (Author of ‘Cosmopolitan translations of food and the case of alternative eating in the Philippines’)

Emerging discourses of the Anthropocene and its critics constitute attempts to grasp a new understanding of reality: the deep and reciprocal enmeshment of daily human practices with Earth’s vital life-support systems. For scholars of food studies and systems, the planetary impacts of high-input monocultures, land clearing, food miles, labour exploitation, retail monopolies, unethical advertising, obesogenic environments and food waste are only some of the issues to be overcome to resolve the profound economic, ecological, social and cultural crises in the twenty-first century and realise a flourishing co-existence for ourselves and the species with whom we live and eat. Employing inter- and transdisciplinary methodologies and building on ‘circular’, ‘just’, ‘slow’, ‘local’, ‘convivial’, ‘healthy’ and ‘sustainable’ food concepts, the emerging discipline of food system studies is uniquely positioned to answer questions about the nature and meanings of such enmeshments as well as offering imaginative yet feasible solutions. How do we make sense of the food futures to come? What new ways of eating well and convivially are there? How can lessons from the past help us navigate increasingly uncertain food futures? What food governance arrangements—politics, policies, regulations—will overcome unconscionable inequalities and deliver food justice? How is and should food be represented in the media? These are just a few of the questions this conference will grapple with.

Situated in Northern Tasmania’s iconic, Kanamaluka/Tamar Valley and the historic City of Launceston, Food Futures in the Anthropocene invites contributions that critically reflect on the nature of food systems that are socially, economically, politically, culturally and technically attuned to place, foster food security and justice, and serve to unite rather than divide communities through convivial food experiences.

We are especially interested in papers that address the following themes:

  • Histories of food and place
  • Food media/mediating food
  • Policy, politics and political economy of food
  • Food regulation and governance
  • Conventional and alternative food cultures
  • Healthy and sustainable food systems
  • Food security, justice and sovereignty
  • Food literacy and education
  • Indigenous food systems
  • Convivial food systems

Postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to participate.

Submit your abstract for papers, panels, workshops and other presentations via the conference website by 31 April 2020.

Notification of acceptance is expected by early June 2020.

All enquiries can be directed via email to: FoodFuturesAnthropocene@utas.edu.au

Food systems Research Fellow and Research Assistant positions at the University of Melbourne

The University of Melbourne is advertising two part-time research positions – a Research Fellow (Food Systems) and a Research Assistant (Food Systems) to work on the research project ‘Building the climate resilience of Melbourne’s city region food system’.

Applications for both positions close at 11.55 pm on 2 December 2019 (AUS Eastern Daylight time).

For more information contact Dr Rachel Carey.

Agri-Food XXVI: Early bird registration closing soon!

Early bird registration for Agri-Food XXVI is closing soon!

Here are two reasons to attend this year’s conference…

Want to know more about mahinga kai issues?
Join Mananui Ramsden on the field trip for a discussion. Here is his inspiring TEDxChristchurch presentation.

Be a part of the vibrant new scene in Christchurch at the Riverside Farmers Market
The market is part of the urban field trip for the conference.